Death Valley Turns Into a Field of Blooms

Death Valley earned its name for being one of the dryest, hottest places on Earth so it’s no surprise that the usually stark expanse of land is getting a lot more visitors lately when a rare sighting such as a superbloom takes place. Said to occur approximately every 10 years, the unfriendly landscape has been blanketed with a field of 20 varieties of brightly colored wildflowers from Desert Gold to Evening Primrose caused by an increase in rainfall and reduced winds followed by a rise in temperature. According to The National Park Service, the inhospitable valley will continue to harbor life as long as the rain continues.

For more bloom power, try Breathtaking Views at the Shibazakura Festival in Japan.

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The mountains of Death Valley National Park covered in yellow wildflowers.

The mountains of Death Valley National Park covered in yellow wildflowers.

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Lost, then found: Via