Impermanence Drives Artist to Create Massive Sand Murals

For some artists, creating something that will live on long after they themselves have passed on is inspirational. Andres Amador walks the road less traveled and is completely at peace with having his art washed away a few hours after completing it. His larger-than-life beach murals can span from 300 to 90,000 sq. feet and takes a minimum of 2 hours to complete during low tide. He uses a rake and a makeshift rope compass for the more geometric designs to make a deep enough contrast of the wet sand against the dryer sand on top. Amador creates simply for the fun of it and doing so at the beach is an added bonus. But how does he really feel when all his hard work gets washed away? According to him, “For me it is more about the process and less about the result. I can be a stickler for getting something the way I think I want it- which is more goal-focused. But ultimately, when it is finished, I let it go. For me the energy and draw is around the act of creation.”

For another type of art that never leaves a mark, try Sand Artist Uses City Streets as Canvas.

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